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Practical Test Part 2 

Introduction These notes deal with the procedure for arranging and conducting the practical part of the qualifying examination comprising tests of eyesight, vehicle safety check questions, driving technique and instructional ability.  A candidate must pass both the part one (eyesight) and part two (driving technique) tests before taking the part three test (instructional ability).
 
Arranging Appointments for Practical Tests  The booking centre at Newcastle will arrange all practical tests.  Candidates are able to book tests online or by telephone with a credit/debit card.  A Journal is raised for the day's work, which records the examiner’s name, location and examination date.  Details of the candidate should include the name, address, the driving licence number, and the type of test to be conducted. The booking clerk will notify the candidate of the appointment using the appropriate appointment letter.  Examiners should be in regular contact with their respective booking office to ensure commitments (e.g. annual leave, TOIL, medical appointments etc.) are recorded on TARS. 
 TARS ensures that no appointment is made for a date that is more than two years after the candidate passed the written part and also that no more than two previous attempts at the test have been made during the current two-year period. Should the examiner become aware that these procedures have not been followed, they should contact the Registrar’s team as soon as possible.

 

Part Two Tests - Preparation of Documents Before the time of the appointment the examiner should prepare a form DL25 for the part two test.  All entries should be in print and clearly written in black ink.
 
Before the test, enter the candidate’s details.  Insert the candidate's title, i.e. Mr, Mrs, Miss, Ms, Mx or other title, followed by all known initials and then the surname, within the boxed area on the DL25B only.
 
In the appropriate boxes insert the application reference number and the numerical part of the driver number (middle six numbers) followed by the date and time of test.
 
Complete the DTC code / authority box and staff reference number.
 
Examiner name is to be printed within the examiner box (again being kept within the boxed area) on the DL25B only.
 
Insert the category of vehicle AD12 along with code “10” for ADI part 2 tests. This should be annotated with an oblique stroke in the respective box.
 
Examiners conducting practical tests at a centre other than their permanent centre will need to be recorded as a “visitor”. This should be annotated with an oblique stroke in the respective box. Vehicle:  Later (when known) insert the registration number.  If accompanied, mark the appropriate box with an oblique stroke.
 NB:  Full details on completion of the DL25 can be found in the DT1.
 
Reception and Identity Checks When meeting the candidate, the examiner should provide a self-introduction and handshake and then apply the following checks pleasantly and courteously.
 
• Check with the candidate the type of test to be undertaken. Check driving licence.  • A photo card licence or a paper type licence and a valid passport. No licence no test. • Ask the candidate to read and complete the insurance declaration on the top left of form DL25. The residency declaration should be ruled through. • Compare the signature on the licence with the signature on the declaration.  Use a UV lamp (as per details covered in DT1) to scan the photo card licence (if presented), check the candidate’s address is still current. . Candidates who do not produce the required documentation will be refused a test.  The terminated test code 20 - No satisfactory ID, should be recorded on the DL25.
 
Duration of the Practical Test  The combined eyesight, vehicle safety check questions and driving test should take approximately one hour (the eyesight test and vehicle safety check questions will normally take no more than a few moments).
 
Eyesight - Test Requirements A candidate is required to read in good daylight, a motor vehicle registration mark for the new style number plates at a distance of 26.5 metres, (or the old style number plates containing letters and figures 79.4 millimetres in height at a distance of 27.5 metres) with the aid of glasses or contact lenses if worn.  The candidate should first be asked to read the number plate of a stationary vehicle, which is obviously more than 26.5 metres away (or 27.5 metres for the old style number plates), care being taken to select a clean plate, which is in such a position as to be properly viewed.
 
If unable to read the first plate, the candidate should be asked to read another one (care again being taken as to its state and position) and, if necessary, allowed to walk forward until it is just over 26.5 metres away. (27.5m for old style number plates).  If the second plate is not correctly read, the official measuring tape should be used to determine a distance of 26.5 metres (27.5m for old style number plates) precisely from a third plate which the candidate should be asked to read from the appropriate mark. 
 Note:  In no circumstances may a candidate be asked to read a number plate at a distance of less than 26.5 metres (27.5 metres for old style number plates).  
 
If the examiner is satisfied beyond doubt that the candidate is unable to read the third plate, a failure must be recorded.  When there is doubt, a fourth plate should be tried at a measured distance.
 
If the examiner is satisfied that the candidate cannot meet the eyesight requirement laid down for entry onto the Register without the aid of glasses, they should attempt to persuade the candidate to wear their glasses.  If the candidate reads the plate with the aid of glasses, then removes them to drive, they should be advised that glasses must be worn for the drive.  If the candidate refuses to do so the test should be terminated.
 
Announcement of Failure in eyesight test  When there is an eyesight failure, the candidate should be addressed in the following terms: -
 
"I am sorry that you have not passed the eyesight test.  You will appreciate of course that the practical test cannot be continued".
 
The examiner's comments should be in a sympathetic vein, and they should expect to listen to some expressions of disappointment, but avoid discussion of matters other than those indicated above.
 NB:  If the weather is inclement or the daylight is not good the test should be terminated, ‘no result’ and the code for bad weather entered on the daily journal.
 
Recording a Failure in the eyesight test A test failure should be recorded by means of an oblique stroke “/” against ‘eyesight test’ on the DL25.  A note should be made in the remarks space on the reverse side of DL25, ‘tape used’ and the number of plates attempted should be stated (i.e. three plates, the numbers and how they were read).  An eyesight failure is a failure of the practical test as a whole.  The DL25C and D should be handed to the candidate in the usual way.  All test documents should be disposed of in the normal way, i.e. the DL25A sent to Central Functions; DL25B should be filed in your office in the normal way.  The Journal should record the failure as code 3 in the result column.
 
Examiners should note that no DVLA Form D255 is submitted for a failure while attempting the eyesight test on a Part 2. The eyesight has been tested at an extended distance to that required for licence acquisition 
 NB:  Examiners need to consider wearing reflective jackets.
 
Vehicle Safety Check Questions Question topic bank for show me Annex A .
 NB:  Examiners must ask two show and three tell for ADI part two. Show questions will be asked on the move when the examiner considers it safe to operate a control. Safety questions are to be selected in rotation and recorded on back of DL25 for audit and quality assurance checks. 
 
Assessment  A driving fault will be recorded for each incorrect answer up to a maximum of four driving faults. If the candidate answers all five questions incorrectly, a serious fault will be recorded. (Follow similar guidelines as per DT1 for guidance on examiner taking action etc.)
 
Driving Technique - Requirements of the Test  Candidates are required to satisfy the examiner that they are skilled, safe and consistent drivers, and the result of the test will depend solely upon their driving performance under test conditions.  Candidates will need to demonstrate that they know the principles of good driving and road safety and apply them in practice. In particular, they must satisfy the examiner on the following subjects: - 1. Expert handling of controls 2. Use of correct road procedure 3. Anticipation of the actions of other road users and taking appropriate action 4. Sound judgement of distance, speed and timing 5. Consideration for the convenience and safety of other road users 6. Eco- Safe driving ability
 
‘Eco-Safe Driving’ From the 10 September 2008, the part two test came into line with all other categories of test.  Therefore, the eco-safe driving assessment will not influence the overall result. The content, assessment and recording of faults within the headings on the DL25 have not changed.  Any fault committed that is assessed as worthy of being recorded should still be marked under the appropriate heading.  The eco-safe driving assessment will be based on the overall performance throughout the test.  Examples of an eco-safe fault are as follows:
 
1. A candidate who brings a vehicle for test with cruise control fitted and in working order would now be expected to demonstrate safe and relevant use. This could be where a fixed speed could be sustained for some distance and it would be reasonable to expect its use.  Subject to prevailing road, weather and traffic conditions this could include use on roads of 30mph as well as on open roads and where national speed limits apply.  Less fuel is used for a set speed on cruise control than by a driver trying to maintain the same speed with cruise control switched of and using the accelerator pedal.
 
Or
 
2. The candidate is driving on an open road and making good progress but will need to reduce speed to satisfy a lower speed limit.  The candidate is seen to demonstrate safe driving procedure and not commit any control or procedure faults to respond to the change. However, instead of timing it well by easing off the accelerator and using engine braking to arrive at the lower speed limit the vehicle’s pace is sustained longer than appropriate by use of the accelerator then followed by use of the footbrake to comply.  Driving finesse with respect to eco-safe driving technique was not displayed as the energy applied to slow the car down on the footbrake could have been eliminated by releasing the accelerator earlier thus saving fuel as well as achieving the same objective of complying with the lower speed limit. 

The examples above do not cover the whole range of eco-safe driving styles and are for guidance. 
 
At the end of the test and after the driving faults have been counted and recorded on the DL25 the examiner should assess whether the candidate has demonstrated competence in eco-safe driving.  If they have not a mark should be made in either the ‘planning’ or ‘control’ boxes or possibly both.  An explanation as to why they have been marked would also be included in the de-brief.
 
The emphasis is on educating the public of the benefits of driving in an eco-friendly style. The candidate should be advised to take time to visit ‘GOV.uk.’ where they can see a film on eco driving and learn how to be eco-safe and save money. 
 
Candidates will also be asked to demonstrate their ability to perform any of the following manoeuvres: -

1. Move away straight ahead or at an angle

2. Overtake, meet or cross the path of other vehicles and take an appropriate course

3. Turn right-hand and left-hand corners

4. Stop the vehicle as in an emergency

5. Reverse parking exercise (bay park or on road) 

6. Driving forward into a parking bay, reverse out either to the left or right

7. Pull up on the right, then reverse back 
 
Alternative Routes It is essential that at each practical test centre, there should be a minimum of three routes for the part two test. There should be at least one route designed to allow traffic signs to be followed on the independent drive. Details of each route should be available at the centre for the use of visiting examiners and be available to view on the National Folder. Routes should be regularly reviewed, updated and rotated as necessary.

Instructions to Candidates  Examiners should take great pains to make theirinstructions absolutely clear. The candidate should be given no excuse to complain of having been flustered or hurried. Directions given for the independent driving section should be in line with advice in the DT1 7.35 (ID Guidance) here
 
Standard Wording In the interests of uniformity during training, the verbal instructions necessary to the conduct of the practical tests have been standardised.  Whilst examiners should familiarise themselves with the standard wordings, these may be varied providing the message remains clear.  Examiners should try to use a natural tone of voice and not sound stereotyped. 
 
Start of Actual Drive On entering the car, the examiner should give a pre-brief, explaining the test and stating that “a high standard of competence is expected” and then the candidate should be instructed, "Follow the road ahead...etc."  They should then start the engine and move off without any further instruction other than that required indicating the immediate route to be taken or instructions for the independent driving section. 
 
Starting the Engine It is important that the candidate should take the usual precaution of seeing that the handbrake is applied, and the gear is in neutral, before attempting to start the engine.
 
Moving Off The test of ability to move away smoothly from rest should include, wherever possible, ability to move off on reasonably steep uphill and downhill gradients.  In districts where no such gradients are available, the examiners should satisfy themselves that the candidate understands how to co-ordinate the clutch while releasing the handbrake when starting uphill.  The test should include moving out at an angle when drawn up behind a stationary vehicle.  In this case, the examiner should observe whether the candidate first sees to the front, then to the rear, that the way is clear for pulling out and gives the appropriate signal if necessary.  A candidate starting on a gradient should be capable of paying attention to other traffic, as well as moving the vehicle away without rolling backwards, or forwards, and without excessive engine revolutions.
 
Signals The candidate is expected to give signals in accordance with the advice given in the Highway Code, i.e. when they would help or warn other road users.  When signals are given, they should be given clearly and in good time.  The emphasis should be on the giving of signals by direction indicators.  If the candidate asks about methods of signalling, they should be told to “signal as you do normally".
 
Normal Progress The candidate should not be regarded as having satisfactorily passed the part two test if they only demonstrate their ability to drive on normal roads at a low speed or in the lower gears.  The examiner, however, should on no account suggest to the candidate any increase of pace as, in the event of an accident, an embarrassing situation could result.
 
Emergency Stop An emergency stop should be carried out on one third of tests chosen at random. It can normally be carried out at any time during the test; but the emergency stop exercise MUST be carried out safely where road and traffic conditions are suitable. If an emergency has already arisen naturally during the test this special exercise is not required; in such cases the candidate should be told and a note made on the DL25.  
 
The examiner should explain to the candidate, while the vehicle is at rest, that they will shortly be asked to stop the vehicle as in an emergency.  The warning to stop the vehicle as quickly and as safely as possible will be the verbal signal "Stop!" together with a simultaneous visual signal given by the examiner raising the right hand to face level.  This should be demonstrated.  Care must be taken that the emergency stop is not applied on a busy road or in any place where danger to road users may arise.  
 It is essential that examiners take direct rear observation to ensure that it is perfectly safe to carry out the exercise. They should explain to the candidate that they will be looking behind to make sure it is safe to carry out the exercise, and that the candidate should not pre empt the signal by suddenly stopping when the examiner looks round, but should wait for the proper signal to be given.
 
The emergency stop exercise must not be used for the purpose of avoiding a dangerous situation.  Where for any reason the examiner is unable to give the emergency stop within a reasonable period, the candidate should be asked to pull up, care being taken to choose the right moment as the candidate will have been expecting the emergency stop signal and may react accordingly.  They should then be advised that the exercise will be given later and that they will be warned again beforehand.  If a candidate asks whether they are required to give an arm signal in making the emergency stop, they should be told that the command "stop!" will be given only when it appears that no danger will arise as a result of a sudden stop. It must be assumed that an extreme emergency has occurred and it is for the candidate to demonstrate the action they would take in such an emergency.  
 NB:  Anti-lock braking systems (ABS) are being fitted to an increasing number of vehicles. Examiners should not enquire if a vehicle presented for a test is fitted with ABS.  Some ABS systems require a variation in the operation of the clutch and footbrake when braking in an emergency and, under severe braking, tyre noise may be heard.  This does not necessarily mean the wheels have locked and are skidding.  Examiners should bear these points in mind when assessing the candidate's control during the emergency stop exercise.
 
Normal Stop During the course of the test, two or three normal stops will have to be made. The words "pull up" should be used.  The imperative "stop" should be used only for the emergency stop.  The assessment of normal stopping should be based on the provisions of the Highway Code; the candidate should be able to bring the vehicle to rest within a reasonable distance of the nearside kerb.  The examiner should observe whether, after the normal stop, the candidate applies the handbrake and returns the gear lever to neutral. 
 
Manoeuvres The candidate is required to carry out two of the following manoeuvres: • Reverse parking (into a parking bay at the DTC or on road) • Drive forward into a parking bay, reverse out to left or right • Pull up on the right, reverse back • The candidate is expected to demonstrate proper care for the safety of pedestrians or vehicles whilst engaged in any manoeuvre.
 Note: Only one of the reverse parking exercises should be carried out on each test 
 
Reverse Parking Exercise The reverse park exercise can be conducted either into a parking bay in the DTC car park or on road.  Follow advice given in the DT1 relating to frequency of use – on road v car park.
 
Parking in a Bay (at the start of the test) Examiners should allow the candidate to reverse into any bay of their choice and no attempt should be made by the examiner to determine or dictate which bay is used or how the candidate should carry out the exercise.

 
When the exercise is carried out at the start of the test the candidate should be asked to drive out of the bay to the left or right (if both options are available) and stop with the wheels straight before reversing into any convenient bay.  This instruction is to prevent the candidate from reversing back into the bay on the same lock.
 
Providing some attempt has been made to straighten the front wheels, examiners should not be concerned if the wheels are not completely straight.  The candidate may elect to drive forward to adjust the angle at which they address the bay they intend to reverse into, or space permitting, they are allowed to drive forwards into one bay before reversing back in a straight line into the opposing bay.
 
Once the exercise has been completed, the candidate can be given the instructions for following directions around the route.
 
Parking in a Bay (at the end of the test) On the approach to the DTC, the candidate should be advised to turn into the car park and reverse into any convenient bay.  The candidate can again make their own choice of bay and carry out the manoeuvre in the way that they choose, given the restrictions that may be imposed by the characteristics of the car park.  Candidates should park within a bay.  In making an assessment, examiners should consider whether the car could reasonably be left, in that car park in the prevailing conditions, in that position. Candidates should not normally be penalised for crossing the lines when entering the bay. Parking outside the bay is unacceptable. 
 
Parking on the Road The candidate should be asked to pull up on the left well before reaching the next stationary vehicle on the left.  They should then be asked to drive forwards and stop alongside the car ahead keeping level and parallel with the other vehicle, then reverse and park reasonably close to, and parallel with, the nearside kerb.  They should be asked to complete the exercise within about two car lengths of the stationary vehicle.  In assessing the exercise, the degree of accuracy expected should be in line with what is required for the left and right reverse manoeuvres, in that the candidate's vehicle should finish reasonably close to, and parallel with the nearside kerb, and within two car lengths of the parked vehicle.   
 
Driving forward into a parking bay The object of this test is to see that the candidate can manoeuvre and control the vehicle in a restricted space.  Proper handling of the clutch, accelerator and handbrake; judgement of the position of the vehicle in relation to the parking bay, and proper observation, is essential. The candidate should be asked to drive forward into a convenient parking bay of their own choosing. They should park within a bay. In making an assessment, examiners should consider whether the car could reasonably be left, in that car park in the prevailing conditions, in that position. Candidates should not normally be penalised for crossing the lines when entering the bay. Parking outside the bay is unacceptable.
 When the candidate is satisfied with their position the examiner should ask them to reverse out of the bay, either to the left or the right, given the restrictions that may be imposed by the characteristics of the car park.
 
NB This exercise should normally be conducted away from the DTC in a suitable car park    

Pulling up on the right on a suitable road, the examiner should ask the candidate to pull up on the right at a safe place. The assessment of this exercise should include the candidate moving safely across the path of oncoming traffic, they should be able to bring the vehicle to rest within a reasonable distance of the offside kerb. The examiner should observe whether, after stopping, the candidate applies the handbrake and returns the gear lever to neutral.
 
The examiner should then ask the candidate to reverse back for about two car lengths, assessing the candidate’s control, accuracy and observation throughout. The candidate should then be asked to drive on when ready. Their ability to move off and safely regain a normal driving position will not be assessed as part of the exercise.
 NB There may be certain circumstances, such as another vehicle stopping immediately in front of the candidate, where it may be necessary for an examiner to ask the candidate to reverse back further or give guidance to assist them moving off. This should be taken into account when an assessment is made.
 
Traffic Signs and Signals The examiner should be satisfied that the candidate acts promptly on all signals given by traffic signs, the police, authorised traffic controllers and other drivers.  At a junction where there is a "stop" sign the examiner should observe whether the candidate complies with the sign by stopping the vehicle at the transverse line, before entering the major road, and waiting there until it is possible to proceed in safety and without inconveniencing other road users.
 
Turning Right and Left (at road junctions) The candidate should be advised well before they come to a road junction that they are to turn right or left.  The examiner should observe whether the candidate approaches with the vehicle under proper control, takes due account of the type of junction and any warning signs, uses the mirrors, gives the appropriate signals in good time, takes up the correct road position before turning, takes effective observation before emerging and adopts the proper position on the road after turning.
 
The examiner should take particular note of the candidate's driving as they approach junctions with poor visibility.  Position and control at minor roads is particularly important.  The route should include a section of residential roads so that the candidate's reaction to intersections of minor roads may be seen.  A driver who is over cautious at a main road will frequently be careless at junctions of minor roads, e.g. will cruise over minor crossroads too fast without taking proper observation.
 
Overtaking, Meeting and Crossing The candidate's behaviour should be observed when overtaking and meeting other vehicles, and when crossing the path of other traffic to turn right.  The use of the mirrors to observe following traffic and the giving of appropriate signals before overtaking should be noted.  While showing consideration for other drivers, the candidate should not give way unduly to other vehicles when it would be normal to proceed. 

 Forms Examiners will use form DL25 for the purpose of recording faults for the part two test.  It is essential that the actual form used on the test be filed with the other relevant documents.  
 
FTAs, FTCs, Forfeiture of Fees and Weather Postponements  In cases where the candidate either fails to attend (FTA) or, having attended, fails to complete (FTC) the test, the DL25 should be annotated with the appropriate numerical code in the activity code box together with brief details of the circumstances in the remarks column on the back of the DL25B.  The DL25A will be sent to Central Functions with the relevant code recorded on the journal before posting to Newcastle.  The DL25B should be kept on file with the rest of the work as normal.
 
Physical Disabilities  Whilst a candidate for registration does not have to disclose a physical disability, the examiner may notice it, or even have it brought to his notice by the candidate.  A physical disability is not necessarily a bar to registration; the ability to do the job is the main criterion.  Candidates will be expected to take direct observation through the rear of the car when carrying out reversing manoeuvres, reliance on mirrors is not acceptable. 
 
It is currently a condition of registration that any potential ADI is able to make direct rear observations as per the advice given above. If it becomes apparent that the candidate is not able to make direct rear observations before a Part 2 test has commenced the test should not go ahead. The examiner should explain tactfully the requirement to the candidate and advise the candidate to contact the Registrar’s team mailto: PADI@dvsa.gov.uk
 
If the examiner is made aware after the test has commenced that the candidate is not able to make direct rear observations due to a medical condition, the examiner should tactfully explain the requirements to the candidate advising them that the test cannot continue. The candidate should be advised to contact the Registrar’s team PADI@dvsa.gov.uk (Normal test termination procedures should be used)
 
Please use code 71 on DL 25 if the test is terminated and record a ‘none’ result in the above circumstances. Full details must be recorded in the examiner’s report 
 NB Disabilities – Special needs Special care should be taken in the independent section of the test to ensure the candidate is fully aware of the requirements and the route to be taken. Tests should not be terminated solely because the candidate is having problems with following directions or a satnav. The independent section of the test should not disadvantage candidates with disabilities. (Please see ID guidance in the DT1 - 7.35) here
 
On 8 June 2015 changes were made to the Motor Cars (Driving Instruction) Regulations.  There is no longer a requirement for all disabled persons and those with a restricted licence wishing to be an ADI to undertake an Emergency Control Assessment (ECA). However, the Registrar retains the power to require someone, whether or not they have a restricted licence, to do so if he deems it necessary.
 
The assessment consists of seven exercises each of which is designed to test the instructor’s ability to take control of the vehicle as and when relevant in the interest of safety.  
 
If it becomes apparent that the candidate might not be able to take control of the vehicle in an emergency situation, the examiner should explain tactfully the requirement and advise the candidate to contact the registrar’s team mailto: PADI@dvsa.gov.uk
 
Condition of Vehicle - Part Two Test   The candidate is required to provide a suitable saloon motorcar or estate car in proper condition, for the practical test.  A soft-top / cabriolet is not acceptable.  It should be fitted with right-hand steering, a readily adjustable driving seat with head restraint and seat belts and a seat for a forward-facing front passenger.  An additional interior rear view mirror will be required for the examiner’s use while sitting in the front passenger seat.  The vehicle may carry advertisements but not 'L' plates.
 Many new vehicles are being fitted with a ‘hill assist’ device as standard.  This system allows a driver, when moving off on an uphill or downhill gradient, a couple of seconds to move their foot from the footbrake to the accelerator before the device releases the footbrake automatically. If this device is fitted drivers still have to co-ordinate the controls and take the correct observation when moving off; consequently, vehicles fitted with such a device are suitable for the practical driving test
From 1 November 2010, all vehicles fitted with an electronically operated parking brake are suitable for use during a practical driving test.  There are usually two ways of releasing an electronically operated parking brake: by depressing the footbrake whilst releasing the parking brake, then coordinating the accelerator and clutch to move away, or coordinating the accelerator and clutch and when the electronics sense the clutch is at biting point the parking brake releases automatically.  The parking brake will not usually release automatically if the accelerator is not used or the controls are not coordinated correctly - providing there is no loss of control either method is acceptable. 
If an examiner needs to take action to stop the vehicle if the electrically operated parking brake is applied and held on when the vehicle is in motion it will bring the vehicle to a controlled stop.  
If the car provided does not comply with the above requirements or with any legal requirement relating to the use of vehicles on the road the test should not go ahead.
 
Examiners are advised to exercise considered judgement and discretion so that no candidate whose test could reasonably be conducted is turned away. (See DT1)
 
The examiner should explain to the candidate that they will not be able to conduct the test and should record the circumstances on the DL25 and complete the journal with the relevant code.  Candidates who protest should be listened to with sympathy and told to forward their
 
objections to ADI Branch. Undue discussion must be avoided.  Although a car used for the test may initially appear to be satisfactory, it may become apparent at a later stage that the vehicle is not in proper condition as to the operation of the controls, or in other ways. In this event, the examiner should explain the situation (on the lines already indicated) and terminate the test.  Any enquiry about loss of fee should be referred to ADI Bookings.
 
Independent Driving The candidate will be asked to complete a section of independent driving (approximately 20 minutes) by using a satnav, or following traffic signs. - See DT1 for guidance details 7.35 here
 NB. Approximately one in every five tests should use traffic signs for this section.
 
DL25 The report form used in test two, DL25, should be completed as follows:
 
An oblique stroke (/) will be the method of recording all levels of faults committed.  The weight of the fault recorded will be within the box of the respective description and under the appropriate heading; i.e. that of a driver fault; a serious fault or a dangerous fault. Examiners must be careful to use a ballpoint pen and press sufficiently hard so that a clear copy is made for the candidate.
 
When each exercise or manoeuvre from two - eight has been completed, a horizontal line will be used to record the fact.  The forward park exercise will be marked at eight. Pulling up on the right will be marked at four. The Reverse Park on the DL25 should also be annotated by means of an oblique stroke against (R or C) to indicate which reverse park exercise has been carried out.  All marks should be carefully recorded so as to not go outside the designated marking areas.
 Back of the Form:  The details required on the back of the form will be entered in the office, after the test.
 Weather Conditions:  Insert a  against the box or boxes to fit the appropriate description
 Candidate:  The examiner should give a brief description of the candidate, in such terms as to recall the latter to mind should the need arise later.  This information should concentrate on points such as irregularity of features, colour of hair, distinguishing marks such as freckles, etc. Description of clothing worn is of little use in the case of suspected impersonation.  The description, though brief, should be sufficient for an investigating officer to be reasonably certain that the person who took the test was either genuine or not. The reference to age should be your assessment. Description should be as per DT1.
 
 Driver Identification code: Insert the code to describe the identification provided   PC Photo card driving licence PP Passport  

Remarks:  After failed tests only, the `remarks' space should be used to record details of performance, for example: - • All driving faults, serious and dangerous faults should be written up • Any unusual behaviour or comment by a candidate during the part two test • Any other special feature of the test.   • Plain language with no abbreviations should be used for all notes under `remarks' • Record the presence of any person accompanying the test
 
The examiner should tick the debrief box on the front of the DL25 only if an accompanying driver was present for the oral explanation.  Where the candidate refuses the de-brief, the examiner should give their opinion as to why in the `remarks' space on the reverse of the form. 
 A pass in the part two test should be recorded by inserting an oblique stroke (/) in the pass box followed by the number 1 in the activity code box.  A failure in the part two test would be recorded by inserting an oblique stroke in the fail box followed by the number 2 in the activity code box.  All entries on DL25 should be in ink, and made as neatly as possible.
 
Fault Markings on Form DL25 • Unable to meet the requirements of the eyesight test (test one) at 27.5 metres • Controlled stop - inadequate braking, slow reaction or lack of control • Forward bay park - incorrect use of controls and / or inaccuracy • Lack of effective all round observation during this reversing exercise • Reverse parking - incorrect use of controls and / or inaccuracy  • Lack of effective all round observation during the reverse parking exercise • Pulling up on the right - incorrect use of controls and / or inaccuracy. Not showing due regard for approaching traffic. • Lack of effective all round observation during this exercise • Unable to answer or demonstrate correctly and safely a safety question • Failure to take proper precautions before starting the engine • Uncontrolled or harsh use of the accelerator • Uncontrolled use of clutch • Failure to engage the gear appropriate to the road and traffic conditions or for junctions.  Coasting in neutral or with the clutch pedal depressed.  Not changing gear or selecting neutral when necessary • Late and / or harsh use of footbrake • Not applying or releasing the parking brake when necessary • Erratic steering, overshooting the correct turning point when turning right or left, hitting the kerb when turning left.  Incorrect positioning of hands on the steering wheel or both hands off the steering wheel  • Failure to take effective precautions before moving away • Inability to move off smoothly; straight ahead, at an angle, or on a gradient   • Failure to make effective use of the mirrors before signalling • Failure to make effective use of the mirrors before changing direction • Failure to make effective use of the mirrors before changing speed • Omitting a necessary signal • Signal not in accordance with the Highway Code.  Failure to cancel direction indicator.  Beckoning pedestrians to cross
 
• Incorrect timing of signal - too early so as to confuse other road users or too late to be of value

• Passing too close to stationary vehicles or obstructions

• Failure to comply with "stop" signs, including "stop children" sign carried by school crossing patrol

• Failure to comply with directional signs or "no entry" signs

• Failure to comply with road markings e.g. double white lines, box junctions

• Failure to comply with traffic lights (not pedestrian crossings)

• Failure to comply with signals given by a police officer, traffic warden, or other persons authorised to direct traffic

• Failure to take appropriate action on signals given by other road users

• Driving too fast for the prevailing road and traffic conditions

• Keep distance - following too closely behind the vehicle in front

• Leave a reasonable gap from the vehicle in front when stopping in lines of traffic

• Driving too slowly for the prevailing road and traffic conditions

• Unduly hesitant

• Approaching junctions either too fast or too slow

• Not taking effective observations before emerging and / or emerging without due regard for approaching traffic at junctions

• Incorrect positioning before turning right

• Positioning too far from the kerb before turning left

• Cutting right hand corners

• Overtaking or attempting to overtake other vehicles unsafely

• Not showing due regard for approaching traffic

• Turning right in a safe manner when involving traffic approaching from the opposite direction

• Incorrect positioning of the vehicle during normal driving

• Failure to exercise proper lane discipline

• Failure to give precedence to pedestrians on a pedestrian crossing.  Non-compliance with traffic lights at a pedestrian crossing

• Normal stop not made in safe position

• Not anticipating what other road users intend to do or reacting inappropriately.  This includes any inconveniencing of pedestrians actually crossing the road at a junction whether or not controlled by lights)

• Failure to use the ancillary controls when necessary.

• Failure to demonstrate an ‘eco-safe’ standard of driving. 
 
Advisory Speed Limits Advisory speed limits are often being used in particularly sensitive areas, such as outside schools, where it is considered that a reduction in speed would benefit the immediate community; they are there to encourage people to drive at a lower speed than they might otherwise do.  
 
In common with assessing all other driving situations examiners must assess whether the driver’s actions are safe and not automatically record a fault if the driver does not rigidly comply.  As in some instances, there may be mitigating circumstances, such as in school holidays or at quiet times of the day, where there are very good fields of vision and low pedestrian activity and safety is not compromised.  However, there will be instances where to exceed advisory limits could not be considered as safe and sometimes especially in
  
narrow residential streets the driver may need to reduce their speed considerably lower than the advisory limit.  
 
Nevertheless, it is not DVSA policy to automatically record a serious fault if a driver does not rigidly comply with such limits.  In common with assessing all other driving situations, examiners must assess whether the driver’s actions are safe.  In some instances, there may be mitigating circumstances such as very good fields of vision and low pedestrian activity.  However, in most instances to exceed these limits could not be considered as safe and sometimes especially in narrow residential streets the driver may need to reduce their speed considerably lower than the advisory limit.  
 
Steering  To ensure uniformity, when conducting car or vocational tests and ADI qualifying examinations, only assess the candidate’s ability to control the vehicle and do not consider it as a fault if, for example, they do not hold the steering wheel at ten to two or quarter to three or if they cross their hands when turning the steering wheel.  The assessment should be based on whether the steering is smooth, safe and under control. Over time vehicle technology has developed and driving technique has had to keep pace with that development, for example; the driver’s use of gears or steering.  In the past, drivers used the gears sequentially but today’s drivers are able to be selective in terms of which gear is the most appropriate for the road and traffic conditions.  No longer do we change down through each gear as we did years ago when brakes were less effective.  Steering is another example, whereby the weight of the vehicle and the effort required turning the steering wheel resulted in the driver adopting a push pull technique.  Nowadays power steering enables the driver to adopt their own safe style of steering with an emphasis on vehicle control rather than a prescribed method.  
 
When assessing the ability of a learner driver it has been a long established principal only to assess the candidate’s ability to control the vehicle. Do not consider it as a fault if for example they do not hold the steering wheel at ten to two or quarter to three or if they crossed their hands when turning the steering wheel.  However, when assessing an ADI part two test examiners are trained to consider technique and on occasions, this may have led to faults being recorded if the driver crossed their hands when steering.   
 
Driving instructors are now being trained to be less prescriptive in their approach when teaching driving, being more focussed on outputs rather than driving techniques. Therefore, regardless of category or type of test being conducted, providing safety is not compromised - there is no deviation from the defined outcome if a driver does not hold the steering wheel at ten to two or quarter to three or crosses their hands when turning the steering wheel. 
 
 
 
Assessment and Recording of Faults  Faults should be assessed as they occur in the course of the test and recorded at the earliest, safe opportunity.  Faults should be recorded on the DL25 as follows: 
Driving faults that do not involve a serious or dangerous situation (Driving fault): -
 
A driving fault of this type, which is considered worthy of being marked, should be recorded by means of an oblique stroke on the left side of the appropriate panel on the front of DL25, level with the item to which it refers. Repetition of the same driving fault should be recorded by means of a second oblique stroke (to the right of the first).
 
Further repetition of the same driving fault should be recorded as additional oblique strokes.  A persistent repetition of a driving fault, showing a pattern in the candidate's driving, may be regarded as serious. 
 Serious faults, or those which involve a potentially dangerous situation, should be recorded by means of an oblique stroke under the S column against the item to which it refers.
 Dangerous faults, those that involve actual danger, should be recorded by means of an oblique stroke under the D column against the item to which it refers.
 
The DT1 gives clear guidance to examiners on the procedure to be followed in the event of dangerous driving by the candidate.  Should a candidate’s driving be so dangerous as to pose a danger to the public or the occupants of the car the test should be terminated and the same procedures given in the DT1 should be followed.
 
Marking Standard  A pass should be recorded when a candidate incurs no more than six driving faults, which do not include a serious or dangerous fault. 
 A failure should be recorded against a candidate who incurs seven or more driving faults or a serious or dangerous fault.
 
Announcement of Result - Test Two At the completion of the route, the examiner should ask the candidate to pull up at a convenient place (as near to the office as practicable) and switch off the engine.  The candidate should be informed of the result. At the end of all tests, the examiner should offer to give a brief explanation to the candidate of the faults marked on DL25.  This is usually best done immediately following the announcement of the decision.  With the candidate’s approval (refer to Data Protection Act – chapter 11) the trainer should be encouraged to listen to your discussions with the candidate.  Our objectives are, after all, to improve the quality of driving instruction and allowing the trainer to listen in means that they may be better informed and consequently more able to give constructive guidance to their trainees on driving skills. 
 
The ‘de-brief ‘box should be marked only when an accompanying driver was present to listen to any feedback.  If a candidate becomes abusive or is so upset that an explanation is obviously of no value, the examiner should abandon the attempt and a brief note should be recorded on the ADI 25.
 Note:  All DL25s must have a cross marked in the ‘no licence rec’d’ box.  This includes FTA’s and terminations.
 
Completion of Test Documents - Test Two Pass - the back of the DL25B should be completed in accordance with the guidance in DT1. 
 Failure - the back of the DL25B should be completed in accordance with the guidance in DT1. All dangerous, serious and driving faults should be included in the remarks.
 
Disposal of Test Documents  After completion of the DL25, the examiner must make a thorough check before handing them to the candidate.
 Pass - DL25C and D should be handed to the candidate. Ask if the candidate requires form ADI 3L to apply for a trainee licence. 
 
The DL25B should be kept in the office for two years. 
 Failure - DL25C and D should be handed to the candidate. The DL25B should be kept in the office for two years. 
 Note: The test results must be recorded on the daily journal.  To protect data the journal is retained in the office.  The DL 25’s are posted along with a batch header to Central Functions in Newcastle.
 In cases where the candidate fails to attend or arrives late or a test is started but not completed, the DL25B with a brief note of the circumstances in the remarks space should be completed and filed at the test centre in the normal way.  The DL25A should be sent to Central Functions at Newcastle with the appropriate activity code recorded; NOTE this only applies if the candidates name appears on the journal.
 
 

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